Environmental Questions

“The average Victorian household uses about 240,000 litres of water per year. Equivalent to emptying and refilling your pool nearly five times, according to savewater.com.au. We should all try to use the water we’ve got wisely, and to reduce the water we waste.”

Q. Your coatings are solvent-based. Can’t you make a more environmental-friendly waterbased product?

A. We’d like to.
Currently, water-based coatings for swimming pools are not as durable as the solvent-based chlorinated rubber or high solids epoxies we make. The gains made would be more than taken back by the need to empty the pool and repaint more often. We are working on it.

Q. Are the coatings safe for fish, for plants, for people?

A. Yes. Once dry and cured, the coatings are inert and do not affect the chemical balance of the pool or pond, or release toxins or bioactive compounds into the water.

Q. What about the emptying and refilling of the pools when refurbishing? Should Australians even have swimming pools in such a dry continent?

A. It’s a good question. We’d like you, as pool owners, to be as careful of your water use as possible.
If you have an average backyard pool and assuming you achieve a minimum of five years of use between repainting, as recommended by Standards Australia, your pool will use about ten thousand litres of water per year, averaged over that time. A paint that lasts longer will decrease that average.
The average Victorian household uses about 240,000 litres of water per year. Equivalent to emptying and refilling your pool nearly five times, according to savewater.com.au. We should all try to use the water we’ve got wisely, and to reduce the water we waste.

Q. What can I do, then?

A. When you repaint or refurbish your pool, go through the following steps.
Contact your local water company to find out if you need to apply for permission to refill your pool after painting. Your local water company will also have some other good tips about saving water, and may have information on rebates you may be entitled to if you do put in some water saving devices or systems in your home.

Contact your local volunteer fire association. (Here in Victoria it’s the CFA.) Some fire organisations will drain your pool for free and put the water to good use, rather than just put it down the drain. If they don’t need it, a tree watering service may want it once the chlorine levels drop low enough. As a side note, if you’re in an area subject to bushfire, ask your local volunteer fire association about putting up a Static Water Supply sign on your property. They’ll appreciate knowing where to pick up some water in the event of a fire.

While you’ve got the pool emptied, fix any leaks in the surface or the plumbing.

Prepare and paint your pool carefully. Shortcuts and impatience will only decrease the number of years of good life you get out of it before repainting.

Consider a pool cover. It will reduce loss of water due to evaporation. So will providing some cover with shade cloth or trees.

If you can partially fill your pool with rainwater, harvested by your roof and guttering, do so. At the very least, you may be able to avoid “topping up” with tap water to replace losses from backwashing or evaporation. If you paint at the end of the season rather than the beginning, you may be able to completely fill your pool using rainwater. A recent study indicates roof runoff can be up to 120,000 litres of water annually per house. Capturing only half of this would allow the pool to be completely filled without using drinking water supplies.

Ponds and water features
Whether you use our product to build a water feature or pond or not, a pond or water feature can add more than just trendiness and resale value for your home. If you design it well, it can support native wildlife. But only if you can keep it healthy and clean without resorting to bactericidal chemicals.

While we don’t support trying to run your swimming pool without an appropriate chemical regime, you can set up a pond without one. If you can set up a system allowing fish, plants, or even frogs to live in it, you’ll be doing your environment, and probably your garden, an enormous favour.

Environmental Questions